Tag Archives: Recycling

APDO recycling archives, This pages only contains the latest news and blogs about recycling, for more articles please visit our blogs page.

Headshot of APDO member Lou Shaw of Clutter Freedom

Spotlight on members’ professional development: Becoming a Home Sweet Home consultant

In this series of posts, we’ll be interviewing professional organisers who’ve undertaken additional qualifications or training and finding out how their businesses have benefitted.

Moira Stone of Uncluttered Wales talked to Lou Shaw of Clutter Freedom in London about becoming part of the Home Sweet Home network of professional organisers.

Becoming part of the Home Sweet Home network of professional organisers

Lou runs Clutter Freedom which covers south-west, south-east and central London. Lou herself lives in Battersea in south-west London near the Thames. It’s a very densely populated area but with a villagey feel. There are old Battersea residents, people who’ve moved to the area to bring up children, and a lot of people moving in and out. With its good transport links to central London, easy access to open spaces, family-sized houses and good schools, it’s a popular choice for people moving to work in London for a few years.

What’s Home Sweet Home and how did you get interested in being one of their contractors?

When I did APDO’s introductory training I met Louise Muratori of Be Clutter Free and we hit it off straight away, supporting and mentoring one another. It was through her Lancashire network that I heard that Marie Bateson, of Cut the Clutter, the APDO Director of Volunteers and UK co-ordinator for Home Sweet Home, was looking to build up the network of professional organisers who are APDO members.

Home Sweet Home was set up in Los Angeles in 2004 to simplify corporate moves and save companies money. Originally helping with internal USA and Canada moves, Home Sweet Home now operates in seven countries, serving Fortune 500 companies and their employees. I’ve worked with people from companies like Amazon, Apple, Netflix and American Express, for example.

I’ve always been interested in homes and moving so I love this work! I also believe in recycling and reusing and I’m keen to help my local community, so that fits in too.

Home Sweet Home sponsor logo

Tell us a bit more about Home Sweet Home

There are two main programmes:

  • Discard and Donate is for people leaving the UK to relocate to another country. In normal times, pre-COVID, we would help them declutter their home, working out what they would take with them and what they would leave behind. These are usually pieces of furniture and items with UK plugs like lights, hairdryers and tower fans. But it could be anything and often includes children’s toys and equipment. I then decide where the items can go, to charity or elsewhere. I like the challenge of getting things out there into the local community.

 

  • Quick Start is an unpack and put away service for company executives moving to this country. We will work in a team, unpacking all their belongings quickly and efficiently and organising their new home. When the executive and family come to their new home to find it ready for them, they’re thrilled! It not only makes the move to a new country less stressful, it also saves them a lot of unpacking time.

 

Marie organised a team of three APDO members to complete a Quick Start service for a family relocating to London from Spain who had to quarantine on arrival. I worked with Susanna Drew of Home Review and Gill Ritchie of Declutter Dahling, unpacking for a family of five into a large central London apartment. It was hard work and a logistical challenge but, yes, it was good fun too and it gave me a chance to meet other organisers.

Home Sweet Home services are offered as part of the relocation package and paid for by the transferring company. The company benefits because staff are happier and less stressed. They also save money as the number of goods transported is reduced and the amount the company saves on shipment covers the cost of Home Sweet Home.

Helping others

The service also helps the environment as less is transported, less packing material is used and there are fewer fuel emissions. And for every tree saved, Home Sweet Home makes a donation to plant three trees. The aim is for as much as possible of the donated items of furniture, household equipment and clothing to make its way back into the community to be reused or recycled.

I worked with a couple who were moving from a fantastic ninth floor apartment near the American Embassy in London to Tokyo. Almost all the items they left behind were donated to a grassroots organisation working to help get homeless people into new homes and other vulnerable people.

What makes a good Home Sweet Home contractor?

  • Being helpful, friendly and efficient while keeping a professional edge. I’m there representing Home Sweet Home and not promoting my own business.
  • Being a hands-on kind of person.
  • Being able to supervise, if required – packing, cleaning and so on.
  • Having a car is very useful.

 

Having the ability to think on your feet and having a certain amount of flexibility. There might be a suddenly remembered or discovered item to be dealt with immediately. Like the forgotten bike shed – which very quickly went on NextDoor. Or the two storage boxes of shoes found under a very low bed that the packers had missed – definitely wanted and needed by the transferee, who was in Frankfurt by then – that I was able to drive up to the shipping company at very short notice to join the consignment heading for Frankfurt.

Being resourceful with a good network. Covid has pushed us all to dig deeper and rethink our networks now charity shops are often closed. I’ve developed new contacts with Big Local SW11 and Wandsworth Mediation Services which supports very vulnerable families and gets homeless people off the street. There’s also Little Village, a children’s and babies’ clothes and equipment bank, which is great for children’s clothes, cots and buggies. I use my local NextDoor and a WhatsApp group and things go very quickly through them. I use a waste removal service for broken or damaged items, furniture without UK fire rating labels, mattresses and other items that charity outlets cannot take.

 

a room filled with packing boxes and a mirror standing against the wall

Tell us about training

Marie Bateson, our co-ordinator, trained with Home Sweet Home in Los Angeles so I was rather hoping that I could too! Unfortunately, I had to do it over Zoom…

The training is done by Jeff Heisler, Home Sweet Home’s President, and Marie. It’s free and takes a couple of hours. It’s very straightforward and there’s no commitment. There’s an introduction to Home Sweet Home and what it does, and then a description of the nuts and bolts of how it works.

When you join the network, you get all the help and support you need from Marie. Paperwork is straightforward. The Cost Saving Report, for example, is in an Excel spreadsheet which includes lists of household items, categorised by room/garden and their average weights. You simply list the number of items of a particular thing, for example, 1 three-seater sofa, 6 hand kitchen appliances, 3 large bags of clothing, and Excel calculates the overall shipping weight saving.

What are the benefits to your business of being a Home Sweet Home contractor?

It’s helping me to have a better knowledge of my own area and community and to build up a wider network of contacts. It’s really nice to get to know people. We’re all rubbing along together and are very loyal to the area. I’ve lived here for 20+ years. It’s like an extended family.

What’s your advice to someone thinking about joining the HSH network?

I’d say give it a go. You’re under no obligation, and you can say ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to any job you’re offered. It does help in quieter periods of your own business.

Clients are professionals who are friendly and appreciative of the service Home Sweet Home offers them. It does take a weight off their minds that the possessions they’re leaving behind are going to a good cause to help people in the area where they’ve lived for the last couple of years.

I’ve been to some amazing properties and recently it’s been nice to have an excuse to zip about London. I’m off to a house in Notting Hill next week. The transferee has provided a list of items so I can plan how to distribute them efficiently. There are always last-minute items, though, that the family decide to leave behind once the packers begin their job so there may be a few surprises.

Training is usually carried out twice a year but if you’re an APDO member and you’d like to get on the books, email Marie as she can often get you on board before the next training session.

Thank you Lou for sharing your work with us and explaining more about the Home Sweet Home network and its services. 

We are delighted to welcome Home Sweet Home as Key Sponsor of the APDO Conference 2021: The Future Is Re-Organised. For further details head to the Conference page!

upcycled shelf unit surrounded by plants

Upcycling: Design that won’t cost the earth

In the final post for Spring Clearing Week, APDO member Linda Cavallini of Tidy Me spoke to interior designer and sustainable living expert Lynne Lambourne about creative ways to reuse and upcycle our clutter.

Design that won’t cost the earth

There are so many ways we can make our clutter count, from donating unwanted goods to charity and friends, to selling them on via trusted eBay sellers, the list is truly endless!

Smaller items always seem to find a quick way out of the house but larger items like furniture often become more of a burden. You may want to get rid of them as you don’t like them any longer because your taste has changed but, think again. Could you repurpose the piece elsewhere in the house by changing the look of it?

Have you ever thought about UPCYCLING?

As a keen promoter of sustainability, I had the pleasure of meeting Lynne Lambourne, a Henley-based interior designer, uber-passionate sustainability advocate and waste warrior, and winner of the Interior Room Designer of the Year 2019, at a webinar she hosted on sustainability.

She is passionate about “inspiring people to live more sustainably in a home that looks fantastic, doesn’t cost the earth (literally) and that you truly love”.

With a wealth of knowledge about upcycling I have asked her how upcycling can contribute to making clutter count.

upcycled jars

Warriors on waste

Lynne is on a mission to educate people and provide them with the tools, knowledge, expertise and passion they need to become upcylers and warriors on waste. She inspires people to think differently and to question the need to buy new, thus helping to reduce the use of landfill and help preserve the Earth’s natural resources.

Her Warrior on Waste movement is going from strength to strength.

Lynne firmly believes that “making a stylish home does not mean rushing out and buying new”. In her words, “A home should be where you have the things you love, the original one-off pieces that you find that make you happy every time you look at them, the things customised to your style”.

I could not agree more.

Every year so much furniture in the UK and elsewhere is thrown away and ends up in landfill, so there is no better time to stop and think about educating ourselves on the importance of contributing to a circular economy by bringing sustainability to interior designs in our homes.

an upcycled chest of drawers

How can we achieve that?

The answer is simple: upcycling, recycling, shopping second-hand, and using sustainable materials whenever we can.

Updating and reinventing unwanted material into useful repurposed products, or transforming a piece of furniture into something unique and different, turning ‘trash into treasure’ by making good use of what we can already find around the house is what upcycling is all about.

Here in the UK, charities such as The British Heart Foundation are leading the way towards a more sustainable circular economy. Their free collection of unwanted goods (which will hopefully resume once COVID-19 restrictions are eased) makes it super-easy to get rid of things and get them back into the system – ready to be bought and used again and again by someone else, the result being no landfill and no waste.

The great news is upcycling won’t cost you the earth.

Lynne’s tips

Lynne has shared some fabulous tips with us :

  • Be sympathetic to the piece
  • Use chalk paint – she is a fan of Annie Sloan
  • Use techniques such as re-waxing, liming, decoupage
  • Be creative when repurposing things, so example turn ladders into shelves and crates into bookcases
  • Her best advice: don’t be scared to try! You didn’t love it as it was, so you have nothing to lose!

an upcycled garden bench surrounded by plants

Acts of care

Lynne puts the word CARE at the heart of everything she does. For her that also means “extending the love you have for your home and family to the planet through the choices you make”.

Making sure that what we put in our homes does not have a detrimental effect on future generations is the first act of care. Small changes can make a massive difference. We are human, we are not perfect, and that is OK. However, we can acknowledge that there are ways in which we can make our lives more sustainable for the planet, for our children, and for generations to come.

Professional organisers can help you see your possessions in a different light and suggest ways to reuse and repurpose items, encouraging you to think before you buy. From food to toys and everything in between, reassessing our needs as consumers and becoming more intentional buyers rather than impulsive ones is a big step forward.

I could not agree with Lynne and her ethos more. I strive to help my clients realise that looking at a simpler way of living will not only free up their minds and their space but is, in fact, the biggest gift for our planet.

For more advice and tips on what to do with your decluttered items, take a look at “Making clutter count: Decluttering during the pandemic” and “10 ways to donate your decluttered items that you may not have thought of!” where our APDO experts have been sharing their suggestions for Spring Clearing Week 2021.

a pile of folded jeans being packed into a box

Making clutter count: Decluttering during the pandemic

The pandemic has forced us to spend more time at home, with many of us eating, working, studying and relaxing in the same space for the past year. Lots of us have been working alongside school science experiments, created hand sanitizer stations and squeezed loo rolls into cupboards unusually full of extra pasta, flour and beans.

Whatever pandemic living has looked like for you, the things and space around you have probably become much more noticeable and you may even have been inspired (or forced) to declutter your surroundings in order to live more comfortably indoors.

Decluttering advice from the experts

We asked our APDO members what tips and advice they had for decluttering during a pandemic and how to get rid of the stuff you no longer need.

Sue Spencer of A Life More Organised is a certified KonMari consultant and encourages people to understand first of all the reason they want to declutter and make a difference. “I know this isn’t anything new, but it’s always a useful reminder for people working on their own” says Sue. “Recognising your motivation and having a clear view of how you want your home to look and feel not only gives you the incentive to get going, but it also acts as a check back on whether to keep items. It provides useful incentive too if you get to a sticking point halfway through and it all feels a bit much”.

Carole Reed from HappySort acknowledges that, “it has been, and continues to be, difficult to declutter because charity shops are closed and most are not accepting donations”.

Where to donate your decluttered items

So, what can you do with your decluttered cast offs?

Carole suggests that you earmark a box or bag in which to put items that are no longer needed. It will be easier to dispose of the item when the time comes if you have already removed it from your living space. This will help you keep on top of your clutter until charity shops re- open.

Sue goes on to suggest that, if you are desperate to get the items out of your house, a number of charities are accepting postal donations. For example, many hospices are accepting donations online or at safe mobile sites which you can check out online.

Shelter, Air Ambulance and British Heart Foundation are all accepting donations of clothing via post-in boxes up to 10 kilograms, measuring up to 60cm x 50cm x 50cm.

Other organisations accepting donations by post include, Smalls for All, Re-Fashion.co.uk and Alzheimer’s Society.

And for further advice about donating, some of our APDO members have put together this post “10 ways to donate your decluttered items that you may not have thought of!” which is packed full of ideas and organisations where you can make your clutter count.

Planning your decluttering

Amanda Terry from An Organised Youhttps://www.anorganisedyou.co.uk/ says “Ask yourself, ‘If I don’t have a use for something anymore, is there someone I know or a cause that will benefit from my decluttering as well as benefiting my own space and wellbeing?'”.

Like Amanda, Esme Fisher of Tidy Coaching suggests identifying charities or companies which are taking donations or selling items during the pandemic, and then specifically decluttering the items they are accepting.

Esme also suggests that you set yourself manageable goals. “Declutter one category of items at a time, for example, clothing and make sure the items have left your home before you start on the next decluttering task. If you don’t work in this methodical way, your donation bags will build up and become even more overwhelming than the clutter!”

clothes rails and shelves in an organised charity shop

Using social media

Facebook community groups have worked well for many. They are a way for local people to give things away during lockdown as they may otherwise not have been able to pass things on until shops reopen.

For example, Bibi Rodley and Kate Curtis-Evans at Simply Organised Essex say that one of their clients has recently relocated from America. Some of her furniture is too big for her new home in Essex because American-style houses can be larger and more open plan. As they explain, “She had to get rid of her very large bookcases quickly before her new ones arrived. This was at Christmas, during lockdown and she didn’t know what to do. We suggested she tried the local community Facebook group and the bookcases sold within a day. She has used Facebook again to dispose of larger items that her children had outgrown, both through giving things away and by selling them”.

Louise Simpson of Louise Simpson Coaching agrees. “Facebook community groups are a great way to find your local charities and you can start by putting up a post asking for details. Most charities have a Facebook page and often post details of the items they are most in need of, but they usually welcome a call to check too”.

Louise goes on to explain that, throughout the pandemic, her local women’s refuge and homeless charities have needed donations more than ever as they have been faced with an increasing number of people needing their support. “You can help by donating lots of items, from food to clothing”, she says.  “They also need items such as furniture and kitchen items to help people get set up in new homes. You can help someone start over with the things taking up space in your home which you no longer have a use for. Due to infection controls they have even been asking for carrier bags to hand out items – no better excuse to clear out that growing stash in your cupboard and why not fill them with items to donate?”

Mel Carruthers of More Organised agrees. As a Trustee for her local refugee action charity, Mel has seen the pandemic’s effect on our decluttering from both sides, both as a professional organiser and as a charity volunteer. “Our depot has been closed throughout the pandemic”, she explains. “But that hasn’t stopped us being able to provide support where we can, usually by issuing requests for help through our social media pages. For example, last weekend we collected unwanted luggage and camping equipment to send to asylum seekers in London. When we heard of the acute need, we were able to tell our followers, ask them to declutter those items, and arrange for them to be safely dropped off at our depot”.

So keep an eye on your favourite charity’s social media. Their shops may be closed, but their work continues, and they need your support at the moment more than ever. And they may be able to give you a solution for your decluttered items.

Upcycling

If you can’t find anywhere to take your donations, maybe you could turn your hand to an upcycling project.

Stephanie Rough of The Organised Zone recommends reusing bottles to make a terrarium. She explains, “A lovely bottle of local gin from some friends now sits on the windowsill providing lots of lovely memories of our former home and, best of all, it’s very low maintenance! If you are green fingered, you can create these yourself or find a producer such as Gin Garden”.  She adds, “Another popular idea is for you to fill empty bottles with string lights to add sparkle to any entertaining area inside or out”.

a bottle upcycled into a terrarium

Anabel Morte Rodenas from Make Room With Anabel says, “If you are a bit like me and don’t like to throw away bags, I’ve found a clever way to upcycle them, reducing clutter and improving organisation, win, win!! Use them as containers, for drawer organisation, for snacks, you name it. For paper bags, just cut them across – I use zig-zag scissors for a fun touch. You can also fold them to the right height. For the plastic ones, I find folding them gives them strength”.

If these suggestions have sparked an interest in upcycling, APDO member Linda Cavallini interviewed interior designer and upcycling expert Lynne Lambourne for Spring Clearing Week recently in this post “Upcycling: Design that won’t cost the earth“.

a photo grid showing bags being cut up into drawer dividers

If you’ve decided to declutter during the pandemic but are stuck about what to do with your unwanted things, your local declutterer and organiser will be able to help. Check out the Find an Organiser database to find your nearest professional.

 

Small succulent plant in a white pot signifying organised recycling

7 steps to create your own home recycling system

Reducing the use of plastics, building sustainable houses, repurposing discarded materials – the media is full of information about the problems consumerism can cause and articles about how much we can do to help the situation. Some of the facts are truly mind-blowing… For example, did you know that the energy saved from recycling just one glass bottle is enough to power a light bulb for four hours? When we recycle we are decreasing the need for landfills and incinerators, therefore reducing ground and air pollution as well as land usage. In this post, Filipa do Carmo of Khora Space Sorted explains how to organise your own recycling system at home.

If you want to lead a more sustainable lifestyle, start with the simple act of recycling. Having a simple system in place is a great way to guarantee your commitment. And by simple, I mean, a system that works specifically for you (and your family or co-workers).

Here are some steps to make it happen:

1. Do your research

Start by checking online for recycling options in your community. You can easily find this information on your local council’s website. As you know, the rules vary enormously depending on location, so do check. This information will serve as a guide to help you with the steps below and provide you with a quick reference guide to check. This is especially useful if you need to separate the different types of waste.

2. Know your trash

If you know the type of waste you create and how often it’s collected it will be easier to decide which bins to get, if you need this extra storage, and where to place your bins. Take time to observe the quantity and type of waste you produce before you decide what to get.

Row of organised coloured recycling bins

3. Make it easy

This is a really important step. If it doesn’t make sense, or is dysfunctional, we will be less likely to commit.

Placing the recycling bin next to the non-recycling one will increase the chances of recycling more. When this is not possible in the space we have available, try to find the nearest location.

Another option is to have different containers which let you separate as you dispose, to avoid having to sort everything twice.

4. Compost

The benefits of composting are endless; it makes total sense to use organic matter to nourish our soil. Some councils offer compost bins and bags which they collect on specific days. Otherwise, you can donate it to local gardeners or allotment holders, or use it for your own garden, if you are lucky to have one.

5. Bathroom recycling

Whilst most households are getting better at sorting their kitchen waste, the same rarely happens in the bathroom. A good solution here is to have two bins in the bathroom too and use one to collect empty plastic bottles and paper which can be recycled.

If you want to push it a bit further, start thinking about using plastic-free alternatives – such as soap, solid shampoo –  or making your own face cream. There are a lot of options out there.

Foliage in a glass jar signifying recycling and environment

6. Battery recycling

Set aside a small box or can in which you can place used batteries and other small electrics. These are highly toxic and need to be recycling in specialised containers. Most supermarkets now have bins for batteries, so keeping your battery box close to your shopping bags will remind you to take them with you when you go shopping.

7. Donation box

Another good idea is to have a donation box into which you can place clothes, electronics and other items you no longer need, but which could be useful to others. It’s always better to keep everything in one place, instead of different piles around your home. In this way, whenever you know you are going to pass by your local charity shop, you can take everything with you in one go. Or perhaps contact a charity to book a collection.

In our recent blog post “What to do with your unwanted stuff” there are some further suggestions of how to recycle the items that you are decluttering from your home.

If Filipa’s post has inspired you to declutter and get organised, you can find your local professional organiser here.